Trollope2

Doctors Dissected: Doctor Thorne, Anthony Trollope (1858)

It’s tempting to characterise the host of doctors in Victorian fiction as a gallery of rogues and romantic heroes. But how do medical practitioners really feature in nineteenth-century narratives? In ‘Doctors Dissected’, a series of blog posts, I’ll be reappraising the roles they play in canonical and lesser-known novels… Anthony Trollope, Napoleon Sarony (New York Public Library)…

NPG 1452; Charlotte BrontÎ by George Richmond

Doctors Dissected: Dr John Bretton, Villette, Charlotte Brontë (1853)

It’s tempting to characterise the host of doctors in Victorian fiction as a gallery of rogues and romantic heroes. But how do medical practitioners really feature in nineteenth-century narratives? In ‘Doctors Dissected’, a new series of blog posts, I’ll be reappraising the roles they play in canonical and lesser-known novels… “Charlotte Brontë”, George Richmond (1850), National Portrait…

L0004377 Cartoon: 'Our pretty doctor' by Geral du Maurier, 1870

The Woman (Doctor) Question and Nineteenth-Century Medical Journals

This post – which reflects on my early experiences of working with nineteenth-century medical journals – first appeared on conscicom.org, the website for the AHRC-funded Constructing Scientific Communities project which my DPhil falls under. “The medical-women question is perennial. It knows no limits; we encounter it at every turn – at the universities and at the examining boards,…

FuseliNightmare

Exhibition Review: Terror and Wonder @ The British Library

“The Nightmare” by Henry Fuseli (1781). Print made by Thomas Burke (1783). Given the way in which the Gothic foregrounds bodily sensations (in the eyes of both its devotees and detractors), I’ve decided I’m not pushing the parameters of The Victorian Clinic too far in choosing to review the British Library’s current exhibition on this…

Women Doctors

Life-Drawing: Medical Women in Fact and Fiction

  Sophia Jex-Blake and Margaret Georgina Todd In “Medical Women in Fiction” (1893), Sophia Jex-Blake – one of Victorian Britain’s pioneering women doctors – catalogues and critiques her fictional counterparts. Focusing on a series of British and American novels published between the early 1870s and early 1890s, she declaims any interest in their “literary value”…

Review: Medicine Matters @ Chelsea Physic Garden

Despite living in London, all too often I feel my social life is stuck in a bit of a rut; a cycle of overpriced meals out and equally expensive cocktails.  Earlier this week I was starting to feel the cultural-withdrawal symptoms set in, and duly scanned the Ministry of Curiosity’s wonderful events listings to find myself…